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Funding to support next phase in lobster aquaculture research

Greg Smith & Senator Duniam18 August 2019 - The University of Tasmania has welcomed new Australian Government funding which will support world-leading IMAS research into lobster aquaculture.

Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries Senator Jonathon Duniam announced the research will receive funding of $5 million over the next five years through the Australian Research Council to will support the establishment of the world’s first sustainable onshore lobster aquaculture industry.

Governor with tropical lobsterVisit by Tasmania's Governor

27 March 2019 - Her Excellency the Honourable Kate Warner, AC, Governor Of Tasmania and Mr Warner toured the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems.

The cutting edge research into the sustainable production of tropical rock lobsters will support the establishment of the world’s first commercial hatchery.

Tasmanian STEM Innovation of the Year awardA/Prof Greg Smith with STEM award

14 November 2018 - The ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems has been recognised for its world leading innovation in rock lobster aquaculture at the Tasmanian STEM Excellence Awards 2018.

On behalf of the research team based at IMAS Taroona, the Hub's Director, Associate Professor Greg Smith, accepted the Minister for Science and Technology's Tasmanian STEM Innovation of the Year award (pictured, right, Assoc Prof Smith at the award ceremony).

Lobster research wins national commercialisation awards KCA Awards

20 September 2018World-leading IMAS research paving the way for the development of a lobster aquaculture industry in Tasmania has attracted more accolades for the University of Tasmania. The University won both of the awards on offer at last week’s  Knowledge Commercialisation Australasia (KCA) annual conference for work supporting the commercialisation of the innovative research.

Bay LobsterResearch paves way for Moreton Bay Bug aquaculture in Tasmania

16 July 2018 - The IMAS researchers who developed a world-first method to breed rock lobsters commercially have now paved the way for a Moreton Bay Bug aquaculture industry in Tasmania. The ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems began researching hatchery techniques for the Bay Lobster, Thenus oriental, better known as Moreton Bay Bugs, in September 2017.

Learning the secrets of lobster lives

5 December 2017 - The mystery of how to close the larval cycle of lobsters on a commercial scale has eluded Greg Smithscience since the 1960s. But now there are some answers, thanks to researchers at the University of Tasmania.

Associate Professor Greg Smith is Director of the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Systems at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS). Associate Professor Smith said the primary goal of the Hub research team on the project was to develop a sustainable rock lobster aquaculture industry. Click here on on the image (above) to watch the video.

Tasmanian manufacturer orders serve of world-leading lobster researchRock Lobster investment announcement

13 September 2017 - A Tasmanian firm is partnering with the University of Tasmania to commercialise ground-breaking research into rock lobster production by the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems.

PFG Group Pty Ltd (PFG), a Tasmanian advanced manufacturer, whose operation includes the manufacture of high-end mariculture facilities and equipment, has invested in a University spin-out company to secure the Australian licencing rights to the research. PFG’s commitment includes the construction in Tasmania of the world’s first commercial scale hatchery.

It’s been called the holy grail of aquaculture...One day old lobster larvae

1 June 2017 - After 17 years researchers from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) based at the University’s Taroona laboratories have developed the solution to a problem that scientists around the globe had been trying to solve for decades.

Led by Associate Professor Greg Smith, the team at theARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems is the first in the world to develop scalable methods to rear rock lobsters through their larval phase in a commercial hatchery setting.

How can we get faster growing lobsters?YouTube Video Audrey Daning Tuzan

12 December 2016 - Lobsters are a hugely popular food. But animals from the same brood stock grow at different rates, which can make aquaculture difficult. PhD student Audrey Daning Tuzan is investigating which animals grow faster, and why. In this video, Audrey explains her research at the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems.

World-leading aquaculture breakthrough to transform lobster productionLobster displayed to media

8 October 2016 - In a world-leading breakthrough for aquaculture, the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems, based at IMAS in Hobart, has developed a unique aquaculture system that makes it possible to establish a new commercial industry for sustainable rock lobster production.

Despite the high value of rock lobsters, until now the long and complex life-cycle had made it impossible to produce lobsters in a commercially scalable hatchery process.

Australian companies are being offered the opportunity to collaborate with the University of Tasmania to scale-up and commercialise its innovative rock lobster aquaculture systems and related technologies.

Lobster shedding YouTube clipRarely seen - juvenile lobster sheds its shell

13 August 2016 - Rare footage of a lobster shedding its skin at the IMAS display at the Festival of Bright ideas in Hobart as part of National Science Week in 2016. Seeing a lobster shed (or moult) its shell is apparently quite rare - some of our scientists who study rock lobster have never actually seen it happen.

Artificial reefTesting blue sky ideas beneath the surface

18 February 2015 - The first steps in a blue skies science project with dramatic potential to significantly enhance seafood production from the sea will be taken today at Taroona, outside Hobart, with the deployment of two artificial reefs on which a population of marine animals can be raised.

Rock Lobster aquaculture and life cyclesYouTube video

15 November 2014 - Professor Stephen Battaglene talks about pioneering work done at the University of Tasmania's Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies to develop rock lobster aquaculture.

News story linkTasmanian aquaculture rocks with new lobster research funding

12 November 2014 - World-leading tropical and temperate rock lobster research is giving Australia front-running at the cutting edge of aquaculture – and business is beating a path to the University of Tasmania's Taroona marine laboratories.

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Authorised by the Executive Director, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
October 1, 2019